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A Fundamental Greek Course
978-0-7618-4861-5 • Paperback
October 2009 • $71.99 • (£44.95)
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Pages: 584
Size: 6 x 9 1/4
By James I.A. Eezzuduemhoi
Edited by Glenn Storey
 
Language Arts & Disciplines | Reference
University Press of America
A Fundamental Greek Course is designed primarily for those who aim at laying a sound foundation for the study of Classical Greek, and for use by everyone who is fascinated with ancient Greek culture. Suited to advanced college-level and university students, syntactical rules and vocabulary have been carefully devised to give to students formidable panoply for mastery of the intricacies of ancient Greek. This book provides a background for comprehending the language of the eminent prose authors of Classical Greece — Thucydides, Plato, Isocrates, Xenophon, etc., as well as the works in Attic-style of the Hellenistic and Roman epochs, particularly those of the Second Sophistic, Plutarch and Dio Chrysostom, and provides excellent instruction for anyone wishing to study the Greek of the New Testament. The text serves as a stand-alone beginning course text or as a supplementary grammar text for use with any other beginning manual.
James I. A. Eezzuduemhoi was educated at Aristotelian University, Thessalonika, Greece, earning a Bachelor of Literature degree in classics, linguistics, Byzantine language and literature, and Modern Greek language and literature. He took a Bachelor of Arts degree in ancient history, Latin and classical Greek from the University of London as an external candidate, and a Ph.D. in classics at the National and Capodistrian University, Athens. He served as dean, School of Humanities and head of the Department of History, Federal College of Education, Yola, Gongola State, and Chief Federal Inspector of Education, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria. He authored The Ancient World, A Simplified History for Schools, and An Ideal Hegemon, in Ancient Greek Literature.
Glenn Storey took a B.A. in Ancient Greek at Columbia College, Columbia University, New York. He then took an Honours B.A. and M.A. in Litterae Humaniores, Classical Greats, at Trinity College, Oxford, before studying anthropology (archaeology) at the Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pennsylvania, taking an M.A. and Ph.D. He currently serves as a professor in the departments of classics and anthropology at the University of Iowa, where he teaches courses as diverse as Elementary Classical Greek, Ancient Sports and Leisure, Method and Theory in Archaeology, and Anthropology and Contemporary World Problems. He is editor of Urbanism in the Preindustrial World: Cross-Cultural Approaches.
Chapter 1 Editor's Foreword
Chapter 2 Preface
Chapter 3 Introduction
Chapter 4 List of Paradigms
Chapter 5 List of Abbreviations
Chapter 6 Chapter 1: The Alphabet
Chapter 7 Chapter 2: Syllables
Chapter 8 Chapter 3: The Verb
Chapter 9 Chapter 4: The Definite Articles
Chapter 10 Chapter 5: Declension
Chapter 11 Chapter 6: Verbs and Sentences
Chapter 12 Chapter 7: Conjugation
Chapter 13 Chapter 8: Feminine Nouns of the First Declension
Chapter 14 Chapter 9: Future Indicative Active
Chapter 15 Chapter 10: Nouns of the Second Declension
Chapter 16 Chapter 11: Perfect and Pluperfect Indicative Article
Chapter 17 Chapter 12: Adjectives of the First and Second Declensions
Chapter 18 Chapter 13: Infinitives and Participles
Chapter 19 Chapter 14: Attic Second Declension
Chapter 20 Chapter 15: The Imperative Mood
Chapter 21 Chapter 16: Nouns of the Third Declensions
Chapter 22 Chapter 17: The Subjunctive Mood
Chapter 23 Chapter 18: Nouns of the Third Declension (Continued)
Chapter 24 Chapter 19: The Optative Mood
Chapter 25 Chapter 20: Nouns of the Third Declension (Continued)
Chapter 26 Chapter 21: Passive and Middle Voices
Chapter 27 Chapter 22: Irregular Substantives
Chapter 28 Chapter 23: Prepositions in Composition
Chapter 29 Chapter 24: Aortist and Future Indicative Passive and Middle
Chapter 30 Chapter 25: Adjectives of the Third Declension, Irregular Adjectives, Comparison of Adjectives, and Adjectives of the Third Declension
Chapter 31 Chapter 26: Middle and Passive of the Infinitive, Participle, Imperative, Subjunctive, and Optative
Chapter 32 Chapter 27: Adverbs, Numerals, Conjunctions, Interjections
Chapter 33 Chapter 28: Contract Verbs
Chapter 34 Chapter 29: Conjugation of Verbs
Chapter 35 Chapter 30: The Pronouns
Chapter 36 Chapter 31: Irregular Verbs
Chapter 37 Appendix 1
Chapter 38 Appendix 2
Chapter 39 Appendix 3
Chapter 40 Appendix 4
Chapter 41 Appendix 5
Chapter 42 Greek-English Glossary
Chapter 43 English-Greek Glossary
[This is] a textbook that William Sanders Scarborough, America's first professional black classicist and author of First Lessons in Greek (1881), could admire as much as I do.
Michele Valerie Ronnick, professor, Department of Classical and Modern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Wayne State University


 
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