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The Human Tradition in the New South
978-0-7425-4475-8 • Hardback
October 2005 • $86.00 • (£54.95)
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978-0-7425-4476-5 • Paperback
September 2005 • $29.95 • (£18.95)
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978-1-4616-0096-1 • eBook
September 2005 • $28.99 • (£17.95)

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Pages: 240
Size: 6 1/4 x 9
Edited by James C. Klotter
Contributions by David L. Anderson; Paul K. Conkin; Cita Cook; S. Spencer Davis; Kathryn W. Kemp; William J. Marshall; John Ed Pearce; Rebecca Sharpless; Gerald L. Smith; John David Smith; Christopher Waldrep and Margaret Ripley Wolfe
Series: The Human Tradition in America
 
History | United States / State & Local / South (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, VA, WV)
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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In The Human Tradition in the New South, historian James C. Klotter brings together twelve biographical essays that explore the region's political, economic, and social development since the Civil War. Like all books in this series, these essays chronicle the lives of ordinary Americans whose lives and contributions help to highlight the great transformations that occurred in the South.

With profiles ranging from Winnie Davis to Dizzy Dean, from Ralph David Abernathy to Harland Sanders, The Human Tradition in the New South brings to life this dynamic and vibrant region and is an excellent resource for courses in Southern history, race relations, social history, and the American history survey.
James C. Klotter is the State Historian of Kentucky and professor of history at Georgetown College. He is the author of several books including Kentucky Justice, Southern Honor, and American Manhood and Kentucky: Portrait in Paradox 1900–1950 and the editor of The Human Tradition in the Old South.
Introduction
Chapter 1: The Lost Cause Legend About Winnie Davis, "The Daughter of the Confederacy"
Chapter 2: Black Zack and Uncle Amon
Chapter 3: Asa Candler: Old Southerner in the New South
Chapter 4: Alfred Holt Stone: Conservative Racial Thought in the New South
Chapter 5: Hester Calvert: Farm Wife
Chapter 6: Ma Rainey: Mother of the Blues
Chapter 7: Dizzy Dean: Baseball's Quintessential Southerner
Chapter 8: Toward a New Social Order in Dixie: Eleanor Copenhaver Anderson and the Industrial Department of the National Board YWCA
Chapter 9: Harlan Sanders: The Man Who Would be Colonel
Chapter 10: Blanche Terry and the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan
Chapter 11: Ralph David Abernathy and the Civil Rights Movement
Chapter 12: Bill Henry Terry, Jr.: An African American's Journey from Alabama to Vietnam and Back
Deep down most southerners are story tellers. Their narratives unite them across boundaries of race, age, gender, class, and culture. Thought of that way, The Human Tradition in the New South is the most southern kind of book because it allows some gifted story tellers to describe some long forgotten people.
Wayne Flynt, Distinguished University Professor, Auburn University


 
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